Today’s Health Awareness Topic: The relationship between your emotions and diabetes symptoms

 

 

 

 

People living with diabetes  may experience a wide range of emotions on a day-to-day basis. These emotions may range from initial anger, resentment, disbelief, and even denial. At times these emotions can be very intense. Sometimes these negative emotions are inappropriately directed at the healthcare provider who gave the bad news of the diagnosis.

Being diagnosed and living with type 2 diabetes does not have to be a stressful experience. Consider that contrary to popular opinion, being ‘stressed out’ does not have to be part of living with any chronic illness including type 2 diabetes.

It is predictable that over time, your emotions will wax and wane. Some days you may feel more upbeat than other days. Rest assured that you are OK. One of the first things that I do with my patients and clients is to work on getting those emotions out in the open so that we can deal with them at the outset.

You have the power to choose how your emotions impact your overall health and well being.

This is especially important if these emotions are not empowering. We all have the power to choose how our emotions impact us. I know this may sound so cliché. But really and truly this is one of the times that you get to choose and that choice directly impacts your blood sugar control. Living with diabetes is a prime example where having the power of choice impacts your overall health and blood sugar levels.

If you are constantly stressed out and angry then it’s predictable that it may be more challenging to get your blood sugars within normal range.

Stress causes the release of hormones in the body. The stress hormones are called adrenaline, noradrenaline and cortisol. These hormones help to prepare the body for ‘fight or flight’. One way that they prepare us for ‘fight or flight’ is by increasing the production of glucose from the liver stores. This is a normal stress response.

However, when you have diabetes, the last thing that you need is more sugar in your blood stream. Your body is already not able to handle the glucose that it has already!

Research has been performed on the effects of a positive mood on our overall health and well-being. On a chemical level, being happy helps to reduce stress hormones. It enhances the release of endorphins and natural serotonin both of which enhances our emotional state and enhances our well-being. If you have a positive and optimistic mindset, then you will feel more empowered in finding ways to better control your blood sugars.

The first step to living an empowered life with diabetes is to get those emotions out in the open. The next step is to deal with these emotions.

It can be challenging for healthcare providers to be able to address all the emotional concerns of our patients  living with a chronic illness. There is no  doubt the 15-minute ‘double-booked’ appointment slot may not help us to connect with our patients and understand how they are actually experiencing their disease but this discussion is important. Be certain to speak to your healthcare provider if you are feeling stressed out or overwhelmed.

Over time some people living with diabetes may begin to experience what is known as diabetes distress.  Diabetes distress is not true depression. Some patients may need the support of talk therapy. It may be helpful to work with a health coach or a psychologist.

As a professional life coach and a physician my stand is for patients and clients living with type 2 diabetes or any chronic illness to experience a vibrant wholesome life.

It is what motivated me create this platform as a way to empower women living with diabetes.

By empowering women, we empower our communities and eventually the planet.

One of the most important things to do is to deal with your mindset and your perception of living with diabetes.

In the first three chapters of the soon to be released updated version of my  book, ‘Dr. Eno’s A-Z  Guide to Living Powerfully with Diabetes’ I write about what I can best describe as the ‘ABCs of a positive mindset’.

They are:

  • A-Acceptance
  • B-Belief
  • C- Commitment to change

Yes you have the power to choose whichever way it goes. Remain committed to how your health and well-being even on days that you may not feel your best.

To take a FREE peek of the first three chapters my upcoming book, click here.

To your Health & Well-being,